Thread: Clayton log arm kit

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  1. #1 Clayton log arm kit 
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    Alright I am finally getting close to starting major overhaul on my WJ. Decided to go with Clayton long arm kit cause it is the best on the market and I want this done right the first time. After looking at the 6" kit (will run 35s) there are some things that I don't need and some that are needed.

    I have bought a pair of axles and got lucky on them. The guy who sold them, had basically the set up i want on my rig. so the brackets are configured already for the long arm. Seems its would be cheaper to put the kit together yourself as i don't track bar, or rear axle mount.

    There are also unibody frame rails included in the kit :
    https://www.claytonoffroad.com/jeep_...ku=COR-2206210

    What are these? are those uniboby stiffeners or just rails for someone building a buggy? I emailed them once, and so far no results. Any ideas?

    After I figure out how to post pictures on here, I will start the thread of the build His name is Hippo
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  2. #2 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    They are frame stiffeners. You have to use those or you risk ripping off mounts. Welding the mounts directly to the 14 gauge sheet metal that Jeep calls a frame is no good.
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  3. #3 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    So I asked Clayton and accorning to him they aren't exactly stiffeners. Quoteing: the rails are NOT stiffeners. They do NOT wrap around the unibody rail. They weld on under the stock unibody. It connects the front cross member, and rear frame brackets.

    Still sounds pretty important, can this be done using a regular 110v welder or is the material thick enough that 220V needed? Anyone has a pic of before and after the rail install?

    Thanks guys!!
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  4. #4 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    No offense, but if you don't know if a 110v welder is sufficient to weld those on or not, you shouldn't be welding such critical components on a unibody.
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  5. #5 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    Thats why I want to learn ahead. The kit costs about about 3k and it will take time to come with the money. On top of that, I want to make my own bumpers, skids and a few other bits and pieces that all require fab work. So trying to look ahead into the future. I am also in school right now and given that this vehicle is still a DD, it will be awhile before I'll get to it. Before then, I want to learn some basic fab work and get the tools required for this kind of job and modification. I also have not gotten a welder yet, cause the axles set me back a chuck of change.

    Already I got the axles that will go under the jeep and want to build this rig right the first time instead of breaking parts. That's why I came to you guys, to experts that can suggest and turn a into the right direction if I'm making a mistake. Hence also a lot of questions.
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  6. #6 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    Look into the welding classes offered by General Air down in the Springs. They will give you a good base understanding of the skill and equipment needed.
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  7. #7 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    DITTO!
    I read the Unibody welding bible like 30 times and paid to take some welding classes before I did my install.
    used a Miller 250 to burn the part on =)
    been my daily driver for like 10 years now and almost zero maintenance has been needed other than greasing things
    awesome setup!
    93' ZJ 4.7L STROKER, Clayton LONGARMS, 4wd conversion, 231 SYE, HPD30, 8.8, BFG 35's, 2000 manifold & injectors, Hesco fpr, Port & polish, LS1 valves, WJ Steering/brakes, KOR SliderZ & steering box brace, Clayton TB bracket and my custom trackbar, Crane ignition, B&M cooler, Tom Woods, etc....
    Quote Originally Posted by Krash80 View Post
    We're all insane here...
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  8. #8 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
    Senior Member Grand Slam West Planner Mtn WJ's Avatar
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    In my opinion doing this with a 110 Volt Mig welder as long as it is a 130amp or higher is possible, however to do so takes someone with experience in welding. For example knowing a hot vs cold weld and how to do several passes correctly on thicker metals. A 220v welder will make it easier for a less experienced person, but it also has risks like over burning making blow holes and in particular this can happen with welding the seams between the brackets and the sheet metal frame. So back to the original suggestions of getting some kind of formal training and then make your decision on what welder to buy.

    I have used 110v and 220v migs and feel they each have a place. You stretch the limits with thicker materials of a 110 and the limits on thinner materials with a 220 welder unless you spend a fair amount of money on it. That is the problem with the value type welders - limited heat settings.
    Last edited by Mtn WJ; 09-07-2017 at 05:41 PM.
    Ask not what your country can do for you; but what can you do for your country. JFK Jan 20th, 1961

    TnT Customs Long Arms, 33" BFG KM2s, Magnum 9k winch, Ready Welder, Custom HP 30/30 front with ARB, Currie HP 9 rear with Detroit
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  9. #9 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    You could also run into duty cycle issues on the more powerful 110 units.
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  10. #10 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    I do plan on also doing my own bumpers, cage (if decide to go full out) and possibly other just around house projects and tools. Sounds like there will need to be a 220 welder first as the house needs to also be wired for that before the 110. So I will end up taking classes. Anyone took them at Pikes Peak Community college by chance? If so, were they worth the money or is the other place mentioned here is just as good?
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  11. #11 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
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    The General Air classes will be more pertinent to what you are doing. I know one of the owners of GA and he told me to go down to their springs location to take the class as it's way better than what they are offering up here. Although they are building out a new facility up here, not sure when that is supposed to be done.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
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  12. #12 Re: Clayton log arm kit 
    Senior Member Grand Slam West Planner Mtn WJ's Avatar
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    The classes the welding shops offer are usually pretty decent to learn a specific welding technique and will be adequate for your needs as Dave mentioned. If you have the time to invest then a CC course is more well rounded but will take a lot of time compared to a welding shop. I had taken classes in High School believe it or not in the 80s. It was similar to what Community Colleges offer now. Mix of gas, mig and arc welding/brazing/soldering/cutting etc. Of course there are certification courses out there and that is a entirely different level of time and expense.
    Ask not what your country can do for you; but what can you do for your country. JFK Jan 20th, 1961

    TnT Customs Long Arms, 33" BFG KM2s, Magnum 9k winch, Ready Welder, Custom HP 30/30 front with ARB, Currie HP 9 rear with Detroit
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